BT streamlining continues with reported £100m Dutch infrastructure sale

UK telco group BT is reportedly flogging £100 million of infrastructure assets in The Netherlands as its new CEO strives to make it a leaner operation.

BT doesn’t seem to have said anything official yet, but the Sunday Times got the scoop regardless. Apparently this is part of an attempt to streamline the struggling Global Services business, as BT currently uses its own infrastructure, such as towers and cables, to connect its Dutch business customers.

There’s not much more to the report other than a claim that, while BT is also looking to streamline its Global Services operations in other regions, including Ireland, Spain and Latin America, it doesn’t plan to completely abandon specific countries.

The report also refers to a previous Sunday Times scoop that BT is also flogging a legal software service called Tikit. It’s reasonable to ask what the hell BT was doing in the legal software business in the first place and if this is indicative of the kind of wild tangents the Global Services business has gone off on in the past, we can expect many more such disposals.

This news comes just days after it was revealed that BT was forced to hand over a bunch of cash to Ofcom due to its historical accounting incompetence. In addition BT announced last week that it was delisting from the New York stock exchange and earlier in the month decided to flog BT Fleet Solutions. Sadly for CEO Philip Jansen, none of this tweaking seems to have won over investors, with BT’s share price down by over 30% since he took over at the start of the year.

http://telecoms.com/499157/bt-streamlining-continues-with-reported-100m-dutch-infrastructure-sale/

5G devices pass 100 mark – GSA

The number of devices now available to 5G enthusiasts has now passed the 100 milestone, demonstrating how quickly 5G is being thrust onto the world.

The hype surrounding 5G cannot be under-played currently. Not only do you have numerous telcos bragging about the speeds available directly below one of the very few 5G cell sites around the country, the devices manufacturers are starting to join the race.

According to the Global mobile Suppliers Association, GSA, as of August 1 there are 100 identifiable devices which are compatible with the 5G connectivity euphoria. In comparison to 4G, not only are 5G networks being deployed much quicker, the devices are much more readily available. For those who suggest consumer and enterprise adoption will be quicker as well, such reports from the GSA will add a lot of credibility.

Looking at the list, 26 smartphones have been identified, nine of which are now commercially available, while eight hotspots (three commercially available) have been clocked and 26 CPE devices (eight commercially available). The commercially available devices might be expensive for the moment, however when more hit the market we suspect a price war might start to emerge as well as more mid-range devices.

Outside of the devices mentioned above, 28 modules are ready, two snap-on dongles, two routers, two IOT routers, two drones, one laptop, one switch, one USB terminal and one robot. There certainly is a wide variety of products available for everyone and anyone looking to get their 5G fix.

What is worth noting is this is only the beginning. 100 devices before a scaled rollout might seem like a lot, but consider the IOT promise in the 5G world, there will soon enough be thousands of different devices for all the different, ridiculous and unimaginable use cases which will be presented.

http://telecoms.com/499093/5g-devices-pass-100-mark-gsa/

India smartphone sales on the up

Most of the world might be experiencing dip with smartphone shipments, but with India playing catch-up in the digital economy, device sales are continuing to rise.

According to new estimates from IDC, Q2 registered the second-highest ever number of smartphone shipments in India. 36.9 million smartphones were shipped in the quarter, 9.9% year-on-year and 14.8% quarter-on-quarter growth, while a total of 69.3 million mobile phones were shipped to India.

This is a country which is under-going its own digital revolution, admittedly a few years after some of the Westernised markets, though it does present opportunities for bewildered and down-beaten smartphone manufacturers.

“Despite the efforts towards multi-channel retailing by almost all vendors, the online channel continued its growth momentum fuelled by multiple new launches, attractive offers and affordability schemes like EMIs/cashbacks,” said analyst Upasana Joshi.

“This resulted in YoY growth of 12.4% for the online channel with an overall share of 36.8% in 2Q19.”

Globally, smartphone shipments are on the decline. Estimates suggest shipments are at the lowest levels since 2014, which can be attributed to a number of different factors. A lack of innovation might be putting people off purchasing new devices, with new flagships offering little more than incremental upgrades. The price of these new devices might also have the same impact, though it is providing a surge for the second-hand market.

Another factor to consider is the up-coming 5G revolution. Telcos are building the hype around 5G, and if consumers buy into the euphoria, why would they consider purchasing a 4G device when more affordable 5G-compatible devices might just be around the corner. The last thing the consumer wants is buyer’s remorse.

These are not necessarily factors which are that influential in India however.

Although it has been considered a growth market for decades, the reality never really fulfilled the promise in telco and technology. Sluggish telcos were happy to sit back and quietly collect profits as aging networks and a pre-historic approach to business slid India down the global digital rankings. And then Jio entered the fray.

Taking a data-centric approach to telecommunications, Jio forced a digital revolution onto the Indian society and dragged the traditional telcos into the 21st century. The result is better and more inclusive networks, consumers using more data and digital applications, leading to increased sales of smartphones.

As IDC points out, 2G and 3G device shipments are gradually declining, while 4G smartphones are on the up. The average cost of devices is also increasing, the $400-$600 segment is the second-fastest growing segment, though the premium segment ($500+) is also starting to gather momentum. 72% of purchases are below the $200 threshold, though $200-300 is the fastest growing area.

This is market which still has a lot of growth potential, not only because of smartphone penetration, but also the ability to upgrade customers to more premium handsets. Let’s not forget, this is a country with a population of 1.339 billion; there will be plenty of opportunities to make money as long as Jio continues to drag the industry forward.

But who are making the most of this digital boom:

IDC India smartphone shipments

These are the smartphone manufacturers who are embracing the mid-tier smartphone segment. Numerous other, more established players, are scaling back in this market, choosing to more dutifully embrace the high-tier. This is an interesting decision.

Firstly, it not necessarily a bad strategy. A significant refreshment cycle for premium smartphones is on the horizon as 5G gets a better grip around the world. There are billions of users who will want to upgrade over the next couple of years; this is big business for those who make a name for themselves in the premium 5G market.

However, there might also be the negative consequence of brand loyalty. India is upgrading to 4G now, prioritising the purchase of mid-tier devices. This is where numerous Western markets were 4-5 years ago. Some might not want to engage mid-tier purchases, bigger profits are elsewhere, but they will miss out on forming a loyalty relationship with this monstrously large market.

India is surging forward into the digital economy, and there are many brands who are embracing the market through this transition. The likes of Xiaomi, OnePlus, Oppo and Realme are using this momentum to challenge the status quo. There might well be a horde of new device manufacturers to consider in a few years.

http://telecoms.com/499089/india-smartphone-sales-on-the-up/

Ren confirms Huawei restructure on the cards

An internal memo from Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei has been doing the rounds, suggesting a major business restructure to ensure the business can survive US aggression.

Although it remains the heavyweight champion in the network infrastructure segment, the last two years have been marred with a White House propaganda mission to limit the prospects of the business. Huawei has remained strong in the face of adversity to date, though in a memo to staff, Ren has admitted the damage has been dealt.

Over the next three to five years, Huawei will undergo a major business restructure to ensure it is capable of withstanding continued aggression from the US. This is a preparatory strategy from the Chinese vendor and we suspect the depth or breadth of the strategy will depend on the winner of the 2020 Presidential Election.

Of course, the inadequacies of the business have been highlighted to date. Although Huawei is not as dependent on the US as its domestic rival ZTE, there are areas where the US ban has hurt the giant. Should Trump win re-election, it would be a fair assumption the anti-Huawei campaign will continue though it might not be as aggressive under a Democrat administration.

Irrelevant to the outcome of the election, a restructure is probably needed and has been highlighted here by Ren.

“We have to complete an overhaul in harsh and difficult conditions, creating an invincible iron army that can help us achieve victory,” Ren said in a memo seen by Bloomberg.

“We absolutely have to complete this re-organisation within three to five years.”

Although the existence of Huawei was not in question, the Chinese domestic market is large enough to support it alone, the international success of the business has been called into question as a result of the on-going US/China conflict.

Huawei has largely been a proxy of the trade war, perhaps due to the success of the business on the world stage. ZTE is a more obvious target for US aggression, it is partly state-owned after all, however it does not have the presence of Huawei. Few companies have leapt out from behind the Great Firewall of China and dominated a segment in the same way Huawei has.

This is the precarious position Huawei currently sits in. Valuable relationships with international telcos are under threat thanks to the US bullying allies into line, while its supply chain is looking dented. Some suppliers can be replaced by alternatives, though there are a couple of areas where it is incredibly difficult. OS Android for its smartphones is top of the list due to fact there are no alternatives which can match.

“Two bullets fired at our consumer business group unfortunately hit the oil tanks,” Ren said in the memo.

This might be a reference to the significant damage which has been done to the consumer business. Although it is still in a position of strength, the reference might suggest it is living on borrowed time.

In the first half results, Huawei said its consumer business has grown by 24% year-on-year, though this now looks to be driven by the domestic market. Research from Canalys suggests smartphone shipments in China have increased by 31% year-on-year for the second quarter, though a decline of 16% for the same period was estimated in Europe. Patriotism is fuelling growth in the domestic market, though Huawei’s international reputation has been dented.

What Huawei looks like in a couple of years in a very interesting game to play. However, the turbulent storms of 2018/19 might lead to a stronger company in the long-run.

If US aggression continues its aggressive campaign, Huawei will be forced to completely restructure its supply chain. If it can maintain international relationships and customers throughout this period of restructure, it will have removed reliance on the US and a major weapon of the White House when attempting to bully its way through international relations.

http://telecoms.com/499057/ren-confirms-huawei-restructure-on-the-cards/

Nokia gets 5G gig from new-look Vodafone New Zealand

Just days after Vodafone flogged its New Zealand business, Nokia has been unveiled as its 5G network partner.

Even though it has been sold, the company still has permission to keep the Vodafone brand and even has favourable roaming rates on other global Vodafone networks. So to all intents and purposes it’s the same setup, just with the returns ending up in someone else’s pockets.

The decision to go with Nokia for the 5G network was presumably months in the making and represents the continuation of a longstanding partnership, so the involvement of the new ownership was presumably minimal.

“We are excited to be joining forces with Vodafone New Zealand, our partner of over 20 years, to bring 5G to New Zealand,” said Tommi Uitto, Nokia’s President of Mobile Networks. “With this agreement, we will enable Vodafone New Zealand to deliver 5G services to their customers and create an even more connected society.”

“We are excited to be working with Nokia to deliver a commercial 5G network for Vodafone and New Zealand, building on our proud heritage of being first to deliver to Kiwis, the best mobile technology available at the time, including 2G, 3G, 4G and now 5G,” said Tony Baird, Technology Director, Vodafone New Zealand.

Vodafone New Zealand will launch 5G in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Queenstown later this year, which will be the first 5G network in the country. It looks like it’s buying the full monty of 5G stuff from Nokia, including RAN, core and design services, so this will serve as a decent shop window for Nokia.

http://telecoms.com/499027/nokia-gets-5g-gig-from-new-look-vodafone-new-zealand/

Google continues to tap into the power of Maps

Ask any Android user and you’ll hear a glowing reference for Google’s mapping features, and the power of investing in the future is on show once again.

This is perhaps one of the most admirable aspects of Google Maps. This is a product which would have cost a lot of money and time to develop, at least to ensure it is the most useful of its kind, while there was little immediate return on investment. Now Google is reaping the commercial benefits of Maps, but it is still keeping an eye on new features, improved experience and, eventually, additional revenues.

“Not only does Google Maps help you navigate, explore, and get things done at home, but it’s also a powerful travel companion,” Rachel Inman wrote on Google’s blog.

“After you’ve booked your trip, these new tools will simplify every step of your trip once you’ve touched down–from getting around a new city to reliving every moment once you’re home.”

Google is not a company which makes money by accident. It might be the most popular search engine worldwide, but every time there is a hint of a glass ceiling, new ideas seem to emerge.

The acquisitions of Android and DeepMind certainly added new elements to the business model, its smart speakers and push into the connected car offer more engagement points moving away from traditional user interface, and Maps is an on-going project which seems to never get old.

This latest push forward from Google makes the mapping product more useful for those who are going on holiday.

Starting with the simplest add-on, reservations for both flights and hotels can be stored in the Maps app, allowing users to horde all relevant details into the same place irrelevant to whether the user has connectivity at that point. For those who have smartphone compatible with the ARCore and ARKit, navigation becomes simpler with pop-up directional graphics on the screen, while AI has been introduced to improve restaurant recommendations. Finally, a timeline has been introduced which can link experiences and content to places.

These are not necessarily revolutionary, but very few Google Maps features are. These are little additions which makes the mapping product easier to use and more useful. The incremental gain is quite evident through every feature which is adding every couple of months, and this is why so many people use Maps as a default application.

As with much that Google does, the features have been introduced to improve user experience and add extra value. However, there is also a great opportunity to commercialise these features without being intrusively commercial.

Looking at the restaurant recommendations, like with the search engine, some establishments will likely be able to pay for more prominent positioning. The same could be said for local landmarks and attractions in cities across the world. Although Google does create useful products, it never does anything for free. The user might not have to pay, but there is commercial element to everything which is being done.

However, what Google does very well is not to over commercialise the platform or product. As soon as something become offensively commercial, users are turned off. Just look at what happened to the core Facebook platform over the last few years. Facebook forgot what the core objective of the platform was, to connect friends and family, and it has started to impact engagement as well as the acquisition of new users through its commercial activities.

Facebook is still the leader when it comes to the social media segment, though other platforms seem to be better at engaging younger audiences, the demographics critical for sustainable revenues in the long-run. Snapchat, Instagram (admittedly a Facebook business), Twitter or Pinterest are not attracting the same experience criticism as Facebook has been over the last few years.

With Google Maps, the team seem to have struck the right balance. It’s a very useful application for numerous reasons and makes money for the search giant.

Another example of improved functionality with no-immediate financial benefit is focused on public transport. At the beginning of July, a new feature which will tell users how busy public transport is likely to be and whether users should anticipate delays on a journey was introduced. This is useful to have but has no immediate commercial benefit. However, when Google also suggests alternative means of transport, Uber for instance, and helps the user make a booking, there will be some sort of commercial benefit.

In helping customers with their travel plans, hotels and airlines can be partners, features and prompts introduced, and money can be made. Booking a restaurant through the Google Maps feature is another way, while the promotion of local tourist attractions is a third. It’s the traditional referral business with a slightly different twist.

Mapping is not a cheap business to enter into, there is a lot of data which needs to be acquired and managed after all. And when you start adding in additional features as Google constantly seems to do, the application becomes increasingly expensive and harder to deliver the promised experience. But this is where Google is a very admirable business; it never skimps when investing in creating a product to meet expectations.

It might have taken years to start to see the profits, but Google is now reaping the benefits of patience.

http://telecoms.com/499029/google-continues-to-tap-into-the-power-of-maps/

Apple credit card is up-and-running

As promised by CEO Tim Cook during the last earnings call, the Apple Card is set to debut this month, with the team already taking applications from consumers.

To start with, randomly selected Apple customers who signed up months ago have gotten access, though the team is now building a list of iLifers who would like to receive the card upon full-launch. To start with, the credit card will only be available to US citizens, though we can’t imagine it will be too long before the ambitious Applers spread their wings internationally.

For Apple, this is another step towards decreasing reliance on the iPhone, a product which has dominated the profitability column for quite some time. In the years of gluttony, few would have complained about this reliance, but nowadays, with smartphone shipments slowing down globally, the desire for diversification has intensified.

Working alongside Goldman Sachs, Apple has said customers can register their interest in the card in less than a minute, which perhaps seems irresponsible considering the seriousness of applying for credit. This little dose of reality will create little concern for either partner, both of whom will be relying on consumer over-indulgence to fuel profits.

That said, there are some interesting gimmicks being included with the service.

When using the card, all purchases will appear in the customers app, as is norm for the industry, but graphics will offer greater insight into spending habits. As you can see below, the distribution of colour on the card image and the graphs below detail how you are spending your money. Pink is for entertainment, yellow for shopping and orange for food, it is an interesting way to display purchasing patterns.

Other features include cash back and lower interest rates, though it is missing some of the perks which are so heavily hyped with traditional credit card providers.

What will be interesting to see over the next couple of months is the receptiveness of customers to a smartphone manufacturer entering into the financial world. Apple has one of the most admired brands worldwide and a cult-like following of customers, but whether this translates into something as important as financial services remains to be seen.

http://telecoms.com/498947/apple-credit-card-is-up-and-running/

Telcos aren’t the only ones to blame for poor mobile experience

We’ve all experienced this frustration. Maybe its ordering an Uber, downloading a document or doing online banking, only for poor performance to be the buzzkill. But what if the telcos aren’t to blame?

When you are down the pub and jealously looking over at the streaming power your mate’s device can conjure, the first question is always the same; who is your contract provider? This usually leads to a moan about one telco being terrible, but they are cheaper, so it’s not the end of the world. Now, some telcos are certainly better at delivering performance than others, but it is not the only factor which should be considered.

This is not to say the telcos are completely blameless, farmers will back you up here, but a new report from Openreach suggests there is quite a notable variance between the performance of each of the device manufacturers when the smartphones are out in the wild.

“All smartphones are not created equal,” Ian Fogg, Opensignal’s VP of Analysis, wrote in the report. “Just as different smartphones offer a variety of camera qualities or screen sizes, they also differ in the network communication features which enable faster download speeds and smoother video streaming.”

Using 117.8 billion measurements from 23.3 million devices between April 1 and June 30 , Opensignal has produced a critique of the top three smartphone manufacturers across a broad range of different nations.

The table below is only a snippet of the research, but it paints an interesting picture:

Country Samsung Apple Huawei
Norway 58 Mbps 44 Mbps 46 Mbps
Switzerland 44 Mbps 45 Mbps 38 Mbps
UAE 32 Mbps 47 Mbps 27 Mbps
UK 25 Mbps 20 Mbps 25 Mbps
USA 28 Mbps 20 Mbps 17 Mbps
Spain 29 Mbps 26 Mbps 26 Mbps
South Africa 19 Mbps 18 Mbps 16 Mbps
India 9 Mbps 7 Mbps 9 Mbps

Across the 40 countries which were included in the research, Samsung’s devices were the fastest on average in 14 of the countries, Apple was fastest in 7. In the remaining 21, there was a tie for the fastest average device speed. Huawei was not a standalone winner anywhere, though it was joint fastest in 7.

Interestingly enough, in some of the markets where Apple is the leader in terms of market share, it is not the best performing provider. In the US, Samsung lead the way in terms of average download speeds by quite a margin, and it also fell in second place in Japan. Australia is another market where the iLeader came up short.

As mentioned before, the telcos are not innocent when it comes to poor performance. Congestion on individual mobile sites, network architecture, line of sight and numerous other factors slow download speeds, but we suspect few people will blame their devices. Another interesting factor is the amount which has been spent on the device in the first place.

As you can see from the graphic above, the difference between high-, mid- and low-end devices is very notable. Many will accept there are differences between the different tiers of devices will offer different performance when they actually think about it, however, the cynic in all of us will simply believe the manufacturers are attempting to bleed as much cash out of customers for additional bells and whistles.

The difference between the tiers is down to exactly the same reason for the difference between the device manufacturers themselves. Devices will have different chipsets, or antenna, or will be able to connect to more frequency bands, there are 40 different bands in use for 4G after all. Different manufacturers will use different components, but then a manufacturer will use different quality components across a range of devices depending on how much it plans to charge for the specific device.

Moving forward, when latency becomes more of a factor, this is another area which could see more variance.

Latency is often discussed today, and while there are few usecases for the moment, this is an area which will continue to develop over the coming years. Release 16 from 3GPP should improve these metrics and drive the creation of new business cases. Soon enough there might be more justification for ludicrously expensive flagship devices outside the realms of bells and whistles.

An interesting question for Apple customers will be the performance of the devices in the future. Over the last few years, Apple has been moving more of its supply chain in-house, attempting to remove any reliance on external partners. The recent purchase of Intel’s smartphone chip business unit is an excellent example.

Apple is a company which excels at a lot of things, but the hardcore engineering of components is not one of them right now. The leader in the modem field is arguably Qualcomm, though considering the turbulent relationship between the two over the last two years, it would surprise few to see a permanent end to it. What impact this has on the performance of the iPhone remains to be seen.

Huawei is another which could be skating on thin ice. Similar to Apple, the Chinese giant has moved more activities to its own components business, HiSilicon, though it is still reliant on external partners in certain areas. A number of these suppliers are from the US, painting an unpleasant picture while it remains on the Entity List, banned from purchasing some critical components.

Corning is one supplier to Huawei, however finding another company to supply the cover glass will be a simple job. When it comes to the highly-specialised semiconductor manufacturers, one of the areas the US excels globally, it becomes a bit more difficult. The likes of Qualcomm, Skyworks Solutions, Micron, Qorvo and NeoPhotonics would have been selected for a reason. There will be alternatives, but you have to wonder whether this will impact performance.

The technology industry is going through an interesting time at the moment, and depending on who you work for, that is either very good or very bad. With the growth of the voice interface and emerging technologies such as AR set to play a bigger role in the future, devices could look and feel incredibly different in a few years.

Interestingly enough, consumers don’t seem to purchase devices based on the performance offered. This might be down to the assumption performance is entirely driven by the telcos, or perhaps consumers do not understand the complexities. Maybe this will change in the future, but it could certainly be a selling-factor for some manufacturers if the consumer actually understands the language, numbers and acronyms.

There will be new factors to consider when purchasing or even using a device, but when things do go wrong, blaming the telcos for poor performance might not be the most complete assumption.

http://telecoms.com/498898/telcos-arent-the-only-ones-to-blame-for-poor-mobile-experience/

Facebook is reading minds while Amazon perfects text-to-speech

A Facebook-funded study has achieved a breakthrough in decoding speech directly from brain signals at the same time as AWS has made automated speech more realistic.

The study funded by the creepily-named Facebook Reality Labs was conducted by San Francisco University. Its findings were published yesterday under the heading ‘Real-time decoding of question-and-answer speech dialogue using human cortical activity’. It claims to have achieved breakthroughs in the accuracy of identifying speech from the electrical impulses in people’s brains.

The clever bit doesn’t seem to have anything to do with the actual reading of these impulses, but in using algorithms and context to narrow down the range of possible sounds attributable to a given piece of brain activity. This helps distinguish between words comprised of similar sets of sounds and thus improve accuracy, with a key piece of context being the question asked. Thus this breakthrough is as much about AI and machine learning as anything else.

At the same time Amazon Web Services (AWS) has announced a new feature of its Polly text-to-speech managed service. The specific announcement is relatively minor – the ability to give the resulting speech a newsreader style of delivery – but it marks a milestone in the journey to make machine-generated speech as realistic as possible.

When you combine the potential of these two developments, two eventualities spring to mind. The first is an effected cure for muteness without the need for interfaces such as keyboards, which would be amazing. The second is somewhat more ominous, which is a world in which we can no longer be sure we’re communicating with an actual human being unless we’re face-to-face with them.

The AWS post makes joking reference to HAL 9000 from the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, but thanks in part to its own efforts and those funded by Facebook, that sort of thing is looking less like science fiction and more like science fact with every passing day.

http://telecoms.com/498812/facebook-is-reading-minds-while-amazon-perfects-text-to-speech/

Huawei pins its UK hopes on Boris Johnson’s fibre plans

The UK’s new Prime Minister has inherited the difficult Huawei decision and the Chinese vendor has wasted no time in applying some gentle pressure.

While campaigning for the top job, Boris Johnson pledged to deliver full-fibre broadband to every single person in the UK by 2025. Many, including this publication, scoffed at the blind optimism of it all, but Huawei seems to see it as an opportunity to demonstrate how important it remains to the UK economy.

Speaking during Huawei’s first half financial announcement, Huawei’s President of Global Government Affairs, Victor Zhang, had plenty to say about the UK. “Boris Johnson has mentioned many times the importance of delivering ultrafast fibre broadband to rural areas,” he said. “We strongly support this vision and are committed to helping the UK deliver it. Rural fibre broadband isn’t just important for connectivity to the home, it will also help power 5G in remote communities.

“The fibre availability in the UK has had a big gap compared to elsewhere. I fully support the UK government and the new Prime Minister to deploy full fibre in the UK. It’s critical for productivity and economic development and in helping remote communities flourish. We can’t deploy 5G in these areas without fibre.”

Ah yes, 5G. That’s the biggie for Huawei, with the US continuing to pressure the UK into an outright ban of the company from participating in any part of its 5G network. With Johnson and US President Trump apparently on good terms Huawei must be privately fearing the worst, but it has to hope Johnson remains open to all sides of the matter.

He at least doesn’t seem to feel rushed into making a final call one way or the other, as the decision to postpone it once more last week would seem to imply. Huawei is choosing to derive optimism from this. “We welcome the support of the UK government with the supply chain review,” said Zhang. “These new regulations are an important step to ensuring robust security and the best technology for all. Personally, I believe the UK will continue to make the right decisions in terms of using the best technology.”

As important as the Huawei decision is, Johnson can’t really afford to think about anything other than Brexit for the next three months as, if he screws that up, there’s a good chance he won’t even be in power anymore. If we finally do properly leave the EU that would probably be bad for Huawei as it would presumably make the US more influential in setting our foreign policy, but that remains a big if.